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Connecting electric vehicles and heat pumps to the networks

You may need to contact your network operator before the installation of a low-carbon technology can take place.

1

Connecting an Electric Vehicle (EV) to the Network


Thinking about switching to an EV? Here's what you need to know.

A. Charging at home

  • Home charging is convenient if you can safely park outside your home for several hours. To achieve faster charging speeds, a dedicated EV charge point over a standard household socket (13A) is recommended (up to 3 times faster when using a 7kW charger vs a 3-pin socket).
  • Before installation, hire a qualified installer who will assess:
    • Suitability of your location for the charge point and the cable to your car
    • Assess the options for adding an EV charge point to your electrical supply (see step 4)

B. Charging Options without a Driveway

No driveway? No problem. There are other charging options available.

Public Charging Stations

  • Strategically located in urban areas, motorway service stations, shopping centres, and high-traffic locations
  • Dedicated apps can help you find the nearest charging points and plan your routes

On-Street Charging

  • Check if on-street charging is available in your area. If not:
    • Consider discussing with your local authority the feasibility of installing an EV gully near your home.
  • Electric Vehicle Association (EVA) provides more information about on-street parking here.
2

Charging
at home


A. Important considerations when buying an EV

  • Charging speed of vehicles
    • Charging speed depends on your vehicle's technology and the infrastructure. No charge point can charge a car faster than the EV's charging rate allows.
    • For example, if the vehicle’s maximum charge rate is 7kW, you won’t charge faster if using a 22kW charge point
    • Find information of various EV models and their home charging times here.
  • Type of charge points and their capabilities
    • Domestic charging points range between 3 - 7 kW providing 10-25 miles of range per hour
    • For more information about the types and charging capabilities of EV charge points, use this link
  • Size of charge points
    • Explore the possibility of installing a larger size of charging point that could allow the use of an upgraded EV or the addition of a second EV in the future
  • Location of charge point
    • Think about the length of the cable and the location of the charge point, ensuring that it will reach the EV charging port, which can be either at the front or at the back of the car
  • Energy use and driving patterns
    • Think about the size of your EV battery and how much energy it will draw
    • If driving long distances regularly consider:
      • Purchasing an EV with larger size battery
      • Installing a larger size charge point that will provide you with enough power time to charge adequately in the time you have

B. Common Misconceptions

Slow Charging

  • Many potential EV owners believe that without a 7kW charger, EVs are impractical due to long charging times, but this is not the case.
  • In reality, 10 hours of 3kW night charging can add approximately 100 miles per day (equivalent to 10 miles per hour). This totals 36,500 miles per year.
  • Considering the average UK driver covers less than 10,000 miles annually, charging may only be needed every three to four days.

Load Limiting

  • Overloading the connection occurs when multiple high-electricity-demand appliances are used simultaneously.
  • An EV is likely to be the largest single electricity draw and so load limiting can allow installation of your charge point without the need to upgrade your home.
  • This can be done by temporarily stopping and re-starting the car charger, which has minimal impact on an overnight car charging session. Talk to your installer about the options available.
3

Choosing the
Right Installer


Selecting the right installer for your EV charging needs is an important decision. Here's how to make an informed choice:

A. Look for accredited installers

  • To ensure safety and reliable work, look for installers holding certifications from government-approved registering bodies, as a guarantee regarding their competence in EV charge point installation.
  • To find out more about government-approved registered bodies, please visit this link.

B. Links to accredited installers

  • For general advice and links to accredited installers use this link.
  • Moreover, certified schemes such as EVCC, HIES, provide assistance in terms of insurance protection and dispute resolution by choosing one of their member installers, who have successfully completed their accreditation process.
  • For additional details about the certified schemes, please refer to the links provided below:
    www.electric-vehicle.org.uk/consumers
  • www.hiesscheme.org.uk
4

Legal
requirements


Did you know that property owners are required to apply to their Distribution Network Operator (DNO) to install an EV charge point?

Reason for the notification required

  • The DNO must ensure that the local electricity network can cope with the increased demand stemming from the addition of EV charge points, or an upgrade will be required to accommodate the additional load.

How to proceed with the application

5

Smart
Charging


Smart charging involves the use of technologies and strategies to optimise the charging process, making it more efficient, convenient, cost-effective, and grid-friendly.

A. Benefits of Smart Charging

  • Smart charging can help EV owners save money by charging their vehicles during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower, thus avoiding high-demand, high-price periods. It can also enable the leverage of time-of-use tariffs.
  • To find out more information on smart charging use this link.
  • Time of use tariffs
    To find out more information about EV tariffs in this link. Please note that the list of suppliers offering EV tariffs presented in the link is not exhaustive.

B. Future developments

Vehicle-to-Grid" (V2G) and "Vehicle-to-Home" (V2H) are two emerging technologies that involve the use of electric vehicles (EVs) to provide power beyond just transportation.

1. Vehicle to Grid (V2G)

  • V2G is a technology that allows electric vehicles to not only draw power from the grid to charge their batteries but also to send electricity back to the grid when needed generating cash for the EV owner.

2. Vehicle to Home (V2H)

  • The concept of vehicle-to-home (or V2H) is similar to vehicle-to-grid (V2G). The main distinction is however, that V2H utilises the energy to power a home rather than being delivered back to the grid.

To find out more information about V2G and V2H schemes, use this link.

Connect Direct

The LCT Database is moving online. We're upgrading to the new LCT Register on ENA Connect Direct and the LCT database will no longer be updated after this date.

When to contact your network operator

There are numerous reasons why network operators may need to be contacted before the installation of a low carbon technology can take place.

These include supply overload, damage to supply equipment, power quality issues or adequacy of earthing. If these issues are identified but not reported prior to installation, consumers can be at risk.

Even when the cut-out rating is known by the installer, the ratings and utilisation of all local distribution network assets require consideration, and cannot be ascertained without contacting the network operator in that area.

When we do not receive notification of low carbon technology installations, we are unable to map the increased network load associated with the rollout of these technologies. This leads to incomplete modelling, which can in turn cause inadvertent stress on assets and ineffective and uneconomic asset replacement programmes – the cost of these programmes is passed onto UK consumers.

Responsibility to keep everyone safe

Everyone involved in the deployment of low carbon technologies has an obligation to ensure they do their utmost to keep our customers safe.

Installers have the responsibility to inform network operators when making modifications to a service under the following:

  • Wiring Regulations BS7671 132.16 Additions and alterations
  • Distribution Code DPC5.2.1
  • IET Electric Vehicle Code of Practice

Note that the requirements under the Wiring Regulations and the Distribution Code are technology/appliance agnostic and apply to supply alterations from the installation of any appliance.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero (DESNZ), formerly the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), has a responsibility to ensure that low-carbon technology installers are informing us of installations made under its subsidies – the Renewable Heat Incentives and the Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme, etc.

Process for heat pump and EV charging infrastructure installations

Electric vehicle and heat pump connection forms and processes share the same documentation.

We have created a Combined Installation Process flowchart illustrating the connection process which must be followed when installing an electric vehicle or heat pump.

  • Electricity network operators will never refuse a connection but work may be required to ensure the connection is fit for purpose
  • For residential properties with new Maximum Demand (MD) between 60A and 100A inclusive – the installer must apply for a connection prior to installation by filling in the form mentioned below and the network operator will confirm whether the new equipment can be connected within 10 working days
  • For commercial properties, you should follow the Combined Installation Process Flow Chart

Installations in excess of 20MW

For installations in excess of 20MW, you may also want to consider a connection to the Transmission System. In this case please contact National Grid Transmission Owner in England & Wales, SSEN Transmission in the north of Scotland and SPEN Transmission in the south of Scotland.

Electric vehicle charging point database

Completing an application form

An associated application form for heat pumps and electric vehicle charge points, which must be completed and sent to the network operator, has been created. This should allow consistency of application to network operators across Low Carbon Technologies. The form is the same whether the installation is a ‘Connect & Notify’ or an ‘Apply to Connect’.

For applications that consist of multiple installations, whether at the same premises or multiple premises, a relevant multi-installation spreadsheet has been created. This form was updated in July 2021 and the previous version is no longer valid.

The process is maintained and governed by our Low Carbon Technologies Working Group. This group contains representatives of all UK transmission and distribution electricity networks, and meets regularly with industry, BEIS, the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and Ofgem (the UK energy regulator) to discuss issues and agree strategies and processes for Low Carbon Technologies that connect to the electricity networks.

Submitting your application

You should submit your completed connections form to your local network operator by email. Find their email address by expanding the 'where to submit your application form' box below.

If remedial work is required by the network operator, the time taken to carry out this work will vary depending on the nature of the intervention required to deliver an adequate supply to the premises being assessed. Each connection is different, so the premises and network must be assessed before providing an estimated time of delivery.

Under all circumstances there is a requirement to inform the network operator of the installation. For help identifying the correct electricity network operator for your premises use our Who's my network operator? tool. You can also find your network operator using the Meter Point Administration Number (MPAN). Digits 9 and 10 of the 21-digit Meter Point Administration Number (MPAN) are the Distributor ID. Find which network operator corresponds to which ID by expanding the 'where to submit your application form' box below.

  • Where to submit your application form
    ID
    Licence area
    Network operator
    Email address for EV notifications
    Phone number for supply assessment
    Phone number for safety concerns
    10 Eastern England UK Power Networks Email 020 3324 1460 0800 316 3105
    11 East Midlands National Grid Electricity Distribution Email 0800 096 3080 0800 678 3105
    12 London UK Power Networks Email 020 3324 1460 0800 316 3105
    13 Merseyside and Northern Wales SP Energy Networks Email 0845 270 0783 0800 001 5400
    14 West Midlands National Grid Electricity Distribution Email 0800 096 3080 0800 678 3105
    15 North Eastern England Northern Powergrid Email 0845 070 7172 0800 66 88 77
    16 North Western England Electricity North West Email 0800 048 1820  0800 195 4141
    17 Northern Scotland Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks Email 0800 048 3516 0800 300 999
    18 Southern Scotland SP Energy Networks Email 0845 270 0785 0800 092 9290
    19 South Eastern England UK Power Networks Email 020 3324 1460 0800 316 3105
    20 Southern England Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks Email 0800 048 3516 0800 072 7282
    21 Southern Wales National Grid Electricity Distribution Email 0800 096 3080 0800 678 3105
    22 South Western England National Grid Electricity Distribution Email 0800 096 3080 0800 678 3105
    23 Yorkshire Northern Powergrid Email 0845 070 7172 0800 375 675
    24 N/A  GTC  Email 01359 302518 01359 302518
    25 N/A  ESP Electricity  Email and Alternative email 01372 227 560 0800 731 6945
    26 N/A  Last Mile Asset Management  Email 01698 404 645  0800 804 8688
    27 N/A  GTC Email 01359 245418 01359 245418
    28 N/A N/A      
    29 N/A Harlaxton Email 0844 800 1813 0844 800 1813
    30 N/A Peel Electricity Email 0161 247 7177 0161 247 7177
    31 N/A UK Power Distribution Limited Email    
    32 N/A Energy Assets Networks Email  
    33 N/A G2 Energy IDNO Limited Email    
    34 N/A Murphy Power Distribution Limited Email    
      Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Electricity Email 03457 643 643 03457 643 643

Electric vehicle and heat pump databases: information for installers and manufacturers

  • Electric vehicle charging point spreadsheet

    spreadsheet of electric vehicle charging points (EVCPs) has been created to support the application process. Electricity networks requires access to technical information, capacity, and power quality data, in order to assess individual applications for suitability to connect to the network.

    In addition to the other requirements detailed in the flowchart, an installer should use the EVCP database to cross-reference their equipment to assist in determining whether they can ‘Connect & Notify’ to the network operator or ‘Apply to Connect’.

    The corresponding columns relate to Power Quality (PQ) aspects only. It is necessary to refer to the flowchart and form for the full process.

    The only EVCP information that will be made publicly available is on the first tab of the spreadsheet ‘A1_Summary’. We welcome installers and manufacturers who have devices that are not in the database to populate the information in the other (template) tabs, which will not be made publicly available, and send it to us for verification.

    One EVCP model should be submitted per spreadsheet.

    Need help?

  • Heat pump spreadsheet

    spreadsheet of heat pumps has been created to support the application process.

    Please note that air-conditioning units are considered a form of heat pump, and hence the same process applies.

    In addition to the other requirements detailed in the flowchart, an installer should use the heat pump database to cross-reference their equipment to assist in determining whether they can ‘Connect & Notify’ to the network operator or ‘Apply to Connect’.

    The corresponding columns relate to Power Quality (PQ) aspects only. It is necessary to refer to the flowchart and form for the full process.

    The only heat pump information that will be made publicly available is on the first tab of the spreadsheet ‘A1_Summary’. We welcome installers and manufacturers who have devices that are not in the database to populate the information in the other (template) tabs, which will not be made publicly available, and send it to us for verification.

    One Heat Pump model shall be submitted per spreadsheet. Data shall be submitted electronically by email using a copy of one of two template spreadsheets:

    Need help?

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