Tech reliance is having an adverse effect on memories

A reliance on technology is taking its toll on people’s memories, with almost a third (30%) of Brits admitting theirs isn’t as good as it was five years ago – according to new research from the Energy Networks Association (ENA).
 
The research found that 40% of forgetful Brits turn to their mobile phones to retain important numbers. 
 
Forgetfulness seems to affect every aspect of our lives. For example, nearly two thirds (65%) of people admit they can’t remember their computer passwords and over 40% struggle with their mobile banking pin numbers. 
 
Added to that, the majority of us struggle to remember important dates and numbers including birthdays and anniversaries. According to the research 40% of Brits can’t remember their partner’s birthday while 70% of us can’t remember our mum’s telephone number. More worryingly, more than one in 10 (13%) don’t know to call 999 in an emergency.
 
In order to alleviate the sheer amount of things people need to remember, the Energy Networks Association – the membership body for the UK’s power network operators – launched 105, a memorable, free-to-call number specifically to help people affected by power cuts. It was launched so there is one easy-to-remember number to call wherever you are in England, Wales and Scotland.
 
105 can be stored easily in people’s phones as the number to call during a power cut. This negates the need to remember longer numbers that apply to different power companies.
 
To help people boost their memory, eight time world memory champion, Dominic O’Brien said: “Everyone has a different way of remembering information, however, there are certain things you can do to help you retain numbers.
 
“One method that is particularly useful is to think of the shape of a number and create a story involving these shapes. For example, to remember 105, think of Theresa May standing outside Number Ten: 10. There’s been a power cut and she is waving for help with her hand: 5 fingers.”
 
David Smith, Chief Executive of the Energy Networks Association, added: “Many people mistakenly believe that they should call the company which they buy their electricity from during a power cut. That’s not the case – it’s the network operators who can help you get the power back on, and 105 is a simple and memorable way to get through to the people who can help.”
 
In order to help get their power restored, people can call 105 from all landlines and most mobile phones, no matter who they choose to buy their electricity from. 
 
More information about 105 and electricity network operators can be found at www.powercut105.com. The new website also provides direct links and details of how to contact network operators online and via social media to get information and updates about a power cut.
 
ENDS